Home-learning expectations and guidance for parents to support their child

    We aim that all children will read at home for at least 15 minutes each night. Parents may also read books to their children to further develop their love of reading. Staff check reading records daily in our personalised reading records.  Those children that do not read at home every night are heard reading in school by a member of staff or one of our parent volunteers.

    How to support your child at home

    We encourage parents to find a quiet place each day to hear your child read at home or share a book with them.  In Key Stage 1, please encourage your child to use their phonics knowledge to sound our unfamiliar words. Once the children have read their book, we would then hope they could discuss what they have read.  Two key questions to ask all children are "What has happened so far?" and "What do you think will happen next?".

    READING RECORDS

    Early Years Foundation Stage (Diamonds) Reading Records

    Reading at Home
    All children in Reception learn phonics at school. They use this to sound out words when reading.
    We expect children to read, to an adult at home, for at least 10 minutes each day. The following pages have questions which can be used in discussions to support your child’s understanding of what they have read.

    Please find a quiet place to sit and hear your child read. Once they have read their book and discussed it with you please comment and sign their Reading Record each night.

    Thank you for your continued help and support.

    GLOSSARY

    Blend
    To combine individual phonemes into a whole word.

    Comprehension
    To make sense of and understand the text.

    Chunking
    To break up a longer word and read it one part (chunk) at a time.

    Decoding
    The process of recognising the sounds that letters make in a word and blending those sounds together to read them.

    Digraph
    A grapheme using two letters to represent one phoneme. We use the mantra ‘two letters, one sound’.

    Fluency
    The ability to read accurately with speed and expression. Fluent readers read words automatically without needing to decode.

    Grapheme
    The letter or group of letters used to represent a particular phoneme when writing.

    Oral Blending
    Used for the early practice of blending. An adult sounds out each phoneme in order and the children responds by saying the whole word.

    Phoneme
    The smallest unit of sound that can be identified in words. We sometimes call this a ‘sound’.

    Prosody
    The rhythm and intonation of reading that displays as expressive reading. It helps to convey meaning and add ‘life’ to reading.

    Segment
    To identify each of the individual phonemes in a word, working all the way from left to right. It is an important first stage of writing (spelling).

    Tricky words
    High frequency words that, although decodable in themselves, cannot be decoded by children using the GPCs they have been taught up to that point.
    Trigraph
    A grapheme using three letters to represent one phoneme. We use the mantra ‘three letters, one sound’.

    KS1 (Rubies & Silvers) Reading Records

    Reading at Home
    All children in Key Stage 1 learn phonics at school. They use this to sound out words when reading.
    We expect children to read, to an adult at home, for at least 15 minutes each day. The following pages have questions which can be used in discussions to support your child’s understanding of what they have read.

    Please find a quiet place to sit and hear your child read. Once they have read their book and discussed it with you please comment and sign their Reading Record each night.

    Thank you for your continued help and support.

    GLOSSARY

    Blend
    To combine individual phonemes into a whole word.

    Comprehension
    To make sense of and understand the text.

    Chunking
    To break up a longer word and read it one part (chunk) at a time.

    Decoding
    The process of recognising the sounds that letters make in a word and blending those sounds together to read them.

    Digraph
    A grapheme using two letters to represent one phoneme. We use the mantra ‘two letters, one sound’.

    Fluency
    The ability to read accurately with speed and expression. Fluent readers read words automatically without needing to decode.

    Grapheme
    The letter or group of letters used to represent a particular phoneme when writing.

    Oral Blending
    Used for the early practice of blending. An adult sounds out each phoneme in order and the children responds by saying the whole word.

    Phoneme
    The smallest unit of sound that can be identified in words. We sometimes call this a ‘sound’.

    Prosody
    The rhythm and intonation of reading that displays as expressive reading. It helps to convey meaning and add ‘life’ to reading.

    Segment
    To identify each of the individual phonemes in a word, working all the way from left to right. It is an important first stage of writing (spelling).

    Tricky words
    High frequency words that, although decodable in themselves, cannot be decoded by children using the GPCs they have been taught up to that point.
    Trigraph
    A grapheme using three letters to represent one phoneme. We use the mantra ‘three letters, one sound’.

    Common Words
    Children should be able to read and spell these words by the end of Year 2.

    Days of the Week

     

    Months of the Year

     

    Numbers

    Sunday

     

    January

     

    one

    ten

    Monday

     

    February

     

    two

    twenty

    Tuesday

     

    March

     

    three

    thirty

    Wednesday

     

    April

     

    four

    forty

    Thursday

     

    May

     

    five

    fifty

    Friday

     

    June

     

    six

    sixty

    Saturday

     

    July

     

    seven

    seventy

     

     

    August

     

    eight

    eighty

     

     

    September

     

    nine

    ninety

     

     

    October

     

    ten

    one hundred

     

     

    November

     

    eleven

     

     

     

    December

     

    twelve

     

     

     

     

     

    thirteen

     

     

     

     

     

    fourteen

     

     

     

     

     

    fifteen

     

     

     

     

     

    sixteen

     

     

     

     

     

    seventeen

     

     

     

     

     

    eighteen

     

     

     

     

     

    nineteen

     

     

     

     

     

    twenty

     

    Common Exception Words
    Year 1

    a

    I

    school

    are

    is

    she

    ask

    love

    so

    be

    me

    some

    by

    my

    the

    come

    no

    there

    do

    of

    they

    go

    once

    to

    friend

    one

    today

    full

    our

    was

    has

    pull

    we

    he

    push

    were

    here

    put

    where

    his

    said

    you

    house

    says

    yo

    Common Exception Words
    Year 2

    after

    could

    hour

    path

    again

    cold

    improve

    people

    any

    door

    kind

    plant

    bath

    even

    last

    poor

    beautiful

    every

    many

    pretty

    because

    everybody

    mind

    prove

    behind

    eye

    money

    should

    both

    fast

    most

    steak

    break

    father

    move

    sugar

    busy

    find

    Mr

    sure

    child

    floor

    Mrs

    told

    children

    gold

    old

    water

    Christmas

    grass

    only

    whole

    class

    great

    parents

    who

    climb

    half

    pass

    wild

    clothes

    hold

    past

    would

    KS2 (Sapphires, Emeralds, Opals & Golds) Reading Records

    Reading at Home

    All children in Key Stage 1 learn phonics at school. They use this to sound out words when reading.
    We expect children to read, to an adult at home, for at least 15 minutes each day. The following pages have questions which can be used in discussions to support your child’s understanding of what they have read.

    Please find a quiet place to sit and hear your child read. Once they have read their book and discussed it with you please comment and sign their diary each night.

    Thank you for your continued help and support.

    Word List - Year 3 and 4
    By the end of Year 4, children are expected to read, spell and use these words correctly and independently in their writing.

    accident(ally)

    disappear

    interest

    pressure

    actual(ly)

    early

    island

    probably

    address

    earth

    knowledge

    promise

    answer

    eight/eighth

    learn

    purpose

    appear

    enough

    length

    quarter

    arrive

    exercise

    library

    question

    believe

    experience

    material

    recent

    bicycle

    experiment

    medicine

    regular

    breath

    extreme

    mention

    reign

    breathe

    famous

    minute

    remember

    build

    favourite

    natural

    sentence

    busy/business

    February

    naughty

    separate

    calendar

    forward(s)

    notice

    special

    caught

    fruit

    occasion(ally)

    straight

    centre

    grammar

    often

    strange

    century

    group

    opposite

    strength

    certain

    guard

    ordinary

    suppose

    circle

    guide

    particular

    surprise

    complete

    heard

    peculiar

    therefore

    consider

    heart

    perhaps

    though/although

    continue

    height

    popular

    thought

    decide

    history

    position

    through

    describe

    imagine

    possess(ion)

    various

    different

    increase

    possible

    weight

    difficult

    important

    potatoes

    woman/women

    Word List - Year 5 and 6
    By the end of Year 6, children are expected to read, spell and use these words correctly and independently in their writing.

    accommodate

    correspond

    identity

    queue

    accompany

    criticise (critic + ise)

    immediate(ly)

    recognise

    according

    curiosity

    individual

    recommend

    achieve

    definite

    interfere

    relevant

    aggressive

    desperate

    interrupt

    restaurant

    amateur

    determined

    language

    rhyme

    ancient

    develop

    leisure

    rhythm

    apparent

    dictionary

    lightning

    sacrifice

    appreciate

    disastrous

    marvellous

    secretary

    attached

    embarrass

    mischievous

    shoulder

    available

    environment

    muscle

    signature

    average

    equip (–ped, –ment)

    necessary

    sincere(ly)

    awkward

    especially

    neighbour

    soldier

    bargain

    exaggerate

    nuisance

    stomach

    bruise

    excellent

    occupy

    sufficient

    category

    existence

    occur

    suggest

    cemetery

    explanation

    opportunity

    symbol

    committee

    familiar

    parliament

    system

    communicate

    foreign

    persuade

    temperature

    community

    forty

    physical

    thorough

    competition

    frequently

    prejudice

    twelfth

    conscience

    government

    privilege

    variety

    conscious

    guarantee

    profession

    vegetable

    controversy

    harass

    programme

    vehicle

    convenience

    hindrance

    pronunciation

    yacht